Are Churches of Christ Evangelical?: An Epistemological Question (Part 3)

Epistemological Priority In the lengthy quote last post, Hughes notes the similarities between fundamentalism and Restorationism that make their distance strange. If I’ve argued correctly that conservative evangelicals (eventually fundamentalists and neo-evangelicals) and Churches of Christ were actually nearly identical in regard to the eschatological ambivalence that has characterized them on the level of worldview,Continue reading “Are Churches of Christ Evangelical?: An Epistemological Question (Part 3)”

Are Churches of Christ Evangelical?: A Historical Question (Part 2)

Richard T. Hughes’s Reviving the Ancient Faith: The Story of Churches of Christ in America is rightly recognized as the premier reference point in Churches of Christ historiography.  Hughes’s analysis is insightful and compelling.  Yet, his slant merits some critique.  In particular, his underlying acceptance of the church-sect typology popular in mid-twentieth century sociology colorsContinue reading “Are Churches of Christ Evangelical?: A Historical Question (Part 2)”

The Forgotten Ways: Ch. 5

The Missional-Incarnational Impulse The ideas that Hirsch presents in this chapter have been widely debated among those interested in the “missional” conversation.  Missional is a notoriously cliché as well as ambiguous word, and incarnational has seen its share of misuse and critique in recent years.  For my part, these words, properly defined, evoke some of the mostContinue reading “The Forgotten Ways: Ch. 5”

Galatians Is Not About “Works Righteousness”

We’ve been studying Galatians here on Sundays. The conversation has caused me to reflect on why it is so difficult to communicate effectively the challenge that exegesis issues to the traditional Reformation and evangelical readings of the letter. I’ll let N. T. Wright speak for the exegesis: What, then, is Paul attacking under the labelContinue reading “Galatians Is Not About “Works Righteousness””

Missional Eschatology in Acts 1-4: Why are you standing there staring toward Heaven?

The introduction of Acts (1:1-5) summarizes the end of Luke and reminds Theophilus about “the promise of the Father.” Luke undoubtedly focuses the reader on that promise, which is the Spirit. The proofs, the appearances, and the continued kingdom teaching all hang in a cloud of unmet expectation. God has proven himself faithful in Jesus,Continue reading “Missional Eschatology in Acts 1-4: Why are you standing there staring toward Heaven?”